Category Archives: Eagles

First case of electrocution of an Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria

Sad news from Bulgaria. The first case of electrocution of an Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria has been recorded by the Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Birds.

The bird, which was tagged with a satellite transmitter, fledged this year in July. Unfortunately the young eagle didn’t live very long.
Electrocution is a major threat to eagles and other raptors across Europe. For example, in 2008 at least 33 Spanish Imperial Eagles were electrocuted.

More information about the tragic case from Bulgaria:
Juvenile Imperial Eagle electrocuted by an electricity pole

More information about electrocution and how to avoid id:
http://www.nabu.de/tiereundpflanzen/voegel/forschung/stromtod/00664.html
(The website is in German, but if you scroll down to the bottom, you can find PDFs about electrocution in various languages incl. English, Spanish, Russian and Portuguese).

A complete German book about electrocution can ordered here:
www.birdsandpowerlines.org

New record year for White-tailed Eagles in Scotland

2009 was a record year for the White-tailed Eagle (also knows as Sea Eagle) in Scotland. The species was completely extinct in the UK but has been successfully reintroduced to western Scotland. Another project to reintroduce them to eastern Scotland started releasing birds in 2007.

This year, 46 territories were occupied (2 more than 2008) and 36 chicks fledged (8 more than in 2008). This is a great success for the Sea Eagle project and for everyone involved in bringing back and protecting Europe’s largest eagle.

More information can be found on the BBC website:
Record year for sea eagle pairs

Sea Eagles could return to England in the near future

The White-tailed Eagle (or Sea Eagle) is the largest eagle in Europe. In the UK, the species was persecuted to extinction. England lost the large raptor in the 19th century and in the 20th century, the last Sea Eagle was killed in Scotland.
Since then, the impressive bird was reintroduced successfully to western Scotland with more than 40 territories occupied in 2009. A new project for eastern Scotland started releasing birds in 2007.
Fore more about the project’s progress, see the Sea eagle project newsletter 2008 .

Now, the White-tailed Eagle could also return to England. The RSPB and other organisations hope to reintroduce the species to England at the Suffolk coast. According to the RSPB, it could take decades or even centuries until the birds recolonise England on their own from Scotland.
A study found the area at the Suffolk coast to be suitable for Sea Eagles. Now, the next step is to start an open debate on how to proceed. The project can only be successful of the local people support it, including farmers and hunters.

For more information, check out the following article on the RSBP website:
The RSPB: Suffolk coast could be home to eagles

Almost 60 hectares of habitat for the Lesser Spotted Eagle passed to NABU/Birdlife Germany in Northern Germany

NABU (Birdlife Germany) has received 59.6 hectares of forest for nature conservation from the BVVG (Bodenverwertungs- und -verwaltungs GmbH), a company of the Federal Republic of Germany who’s tasks is it to sell or lease forests and agricultural areas in eastern Germany .
The forest (in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, north-eastern Germany) is home to the Lesser Spotted Eagle, which is critically endangered in Germany. The forest is also valuable habitat for other birds. Observed species include the Common Cranes, European Honey-Buzzard, Middle Spotted Woodpecker, Black Stork, Stock Pigeon and Red-breasted Flycatcher.

The NABU hopes to get even more important eagle habitat for conservation in the future.

More information (in German):
http://www.schreiadlerschutz.de/wp/index.php?p=152

Interview about Eastern Imperial Eagle in Austria published

I just published another interview on europeanraptors.org.
This one is with Gabor Wichmann from Birdlife Austria about the current status and conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Austria.

The interview:
Interview with Gabor Wichmann from Birdlife Austria about the conservation of the Eastern Imperail Eagle in Austria

More interviews, including about Eastern Imperial Eagles, will be published soon.

New record year for White-tailed Eagles in Schleswig-Holstein (northern Germany)

Another great year for the White-tailed Sea Eagle in Schleswig-Holstein, the northernmost of the 16 states of Germany.
With only a few pairs in the 1970s, the Sea Eagle was close to extinction in West Germany. But since then, the population has increased dramatically and in 2009, 63 pairs occupied a territory. That’s an increase of 6 pairs compared to 2008.
54 pairs started breeding and 40 of them finished it and raised 68 young eagles. That’s 8 less than in 2008 but still a very good breeding success.
The population of the White-tailed Eagle (or Sea Eagle) was about 600 pairs in 2008 in Germany. It is very likely that this year the number will be even higher, especially when the results in other states are as encouraging as those in Schleswig-Holstein.

More information about the conservation of the White-tailed Eagle in Schleswig-Holstein can be found here:
www.projektgruppeseeadlerschutz.de

Upcoming book: The Eagle Watchers

The Eagle Watchers

The Eagle Watchers

There will be a new book published in April 2010 about eagle conservation and research around the world. It is called “The Eagle Watchers” and is edited by Ruth Tingay and Todd Katzner.

In the book 29 biologists tell stories about 24 eagle species on 6 continents.
European species covered in the book are:

  • Golden Eagle
  • White-tailed Eagle
  • Lesser Spotted Eagle
  • Eastern Imperial Eagle
  • Spanish Imperial Eagle

Many other fascinating eagle species are covered including Martial Eagle, Harpy Eagle, African Crowned Eagle and many more.

More information about the book:
Publication Date: Apri 2010
ISBN: 978-0-8014-4873-7
Published by Cornel University Press
Publisher’s Website about the book

PDF Flyer
flyer_eagle_watchers.pdf

Table of contents:

PREFACE
Ruth Tingay & Todd Katzner

FOREWORD
Keith Bildstein & Jemima Parry-Jones

CHAPTER 1: EAGLE DIVERSITY, ECOLOGY & CONSERVATION
Todd Katzner & Ruth Tingay

CHAPTER 2: NEW GUINEA HARPY EAGLE
Mark Watson (New Guinea)
Martin Gilbert (New Guinea)

CHAPTER 3: GOLDEN EAGLE
Carol McIntyre (Alaska)
Jeff Watson (Scotland)

CHAPTER 4: LESSER SPOTTED EAGLE
Bernd Meyburg (Czechoslovakia & Germany)

CHAPTER 5: WEDGE-TAILED EAGLE
Penny Olsen (Australia)

CHAPTER 6: MADAGASCAR SERPENT EAGLE
Sarah Karpanty (Madagascar)

CHAPTER 7: BALD EAGLE
Al Harmata (USA)
Teryl Grubb (USA)

CHAPTER 8: VERREAUX’S EAGLE
Rob Davies (South Africa)

CHAPTER 9: EASTERN IMPERIAL EAGLE
Todd Katzner (Kazakhstan)

CHAPTER 10: STELLER’S SEA EAGLE
Keisuke Saito (Japan)

CHAPTER 11: SPANISH IMPERIAL EAGLE
Miguel Ferrer (Spain)

CHAPTER 12: MADAGASCAR FISH EAGLE
Ruth Tingay (Madagascar)

CHAPTER 13: AFRICAN CROWNED EAGLE
Susanne Shultz (Ivory Coast)

CHAPTER 14: GREY-HEADED FISH EAGLE
Malcolm Nicoll (Cambodia)

CHAPTER 15: WAHLBERG’S EAGLE
Rob Simmons (South Africa)

CHAPTER 16: SOLITARY EAGLE
Bill Clark (Mexico)

CHAPTER 17: JAVAN HAWK EAGLE
Vincent Nijman (Indonesia)

CHAPTER 18: AFRICAN FISH EAGLE
Munir Virani (Kenya)

CHAPTER 19: BATELEUR
Rick Watson (South Africa)

CHAPTER 20: HARPY EAGLE
Janeene Touchton (Panama)

CHAPTER 21: WHITE-BELLIED SEA EAGLE
Jason Wiersma (Tasmania)

CHAPTER 22: MARTIAL EAGLE
Andrew Jenkins (South Africa)

CHAPTER 23: WHITE-TAILED SEA EAGLE
Justin Grant (Scotland)
Bjorn Helander (Sweden)
John Love (Scotland)

CHAPTER 24: BLACK AND CHESTNUT EAGLE
Ursula Valdez (Peru)

CHAPTER 25: PHILIPPINE EAGLE
Hector Miranda (Philippines)

APPENDIX 1: CONSERVATION STATUS OF THE WORLD’S EAGLES
FURTHER READING

Interview about Lesser Spotted Eagles in Germany published

The first interview on europeanraptors.org is online:

Interview with Britta Gronewold from NABU/Birdlife Germany about the conservation of the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Germany.

It contains interesting information about the current situation of the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Germany and explains what NABU/Birdlife Germany is doing to protect the species.

More interviews coming soon.

Green Balkans Federation starts new project for Lesser Kestrel, Cinereous Vulture and Eastern Imperial Eagle

The organisation Green Balkans started a new project called “Conservation activities for EEC Birds Directive target species – Lesser Kestrel, Black Vulture and Imperial Eagle in their main habitats in Bulgaria”. The project is supported by the European union. (Black Vulture is another name for the Cinereous Vulture).

All the species are endangered in Europe. The main goals for the project are:

  • support and maintenance of the populations of rare bird species included in the EEC Birds Directive (79/409/ЕЕС) and their habitats
  • creating conditions for increasing their numbers and restoring their populations in their former habitats
  • reducing the conflict between the target species and the realization of investment intentions and projects
  • increasing the nesting success of the breeding Imperial eagles and Black vultures
  • improving the conditions for nesting of the target species
  • “ex-situ” activities for restoring the population of the Lesser Kestrel
  • identification of areas from the habitats of the target species sensitive to investment intentions
  • raising the public awareness on the aims and effects of raptor conservation and biodiversity protection in general
  • All three species were a lot more widespread on the Balkan in the past. The new project is an important steps towards securing and improving the future of those raptors on the Balkan.

    More information:
    Green Balkans Federation started a European project for the conservation of threatened bird species

Very good year for Eastern Imperial Eagles in Bulgaria

The breeding season 2009 was very good for the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria. 20 young eagles fledged which is a new record. 6 of the nests were guarded by volunteers of the Bulgarian Society for the Protection of Birds and 8 young eagles fledged from those nests.
7 of the 20 young eagles are tagged with satellite transmitters to learn more about their survival and movements.

This is great news. Another record was achieved in Austria where 4 successful pairs raised 9 young. This is a success rate of 2.25 young fledged for every successful pair.

More information about the good news from Bulgaria:
Successful breeding season for Imperial Eagles in Bulgaria