Category Archives: Eagles

New Interview with Daróczi J. Szilárd and Zeitz Róbert about the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Romania

 

Lesser Spotted Eagle chick in the nest .
© Zeitz Róbert

I am happy to announce another interview, this time with Daróczi J. Szilárd and Zeitz Róbert about the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Romania.
The Lesser Spotted Eagle has it’s breeding population entirely in Europe (while migrating to Africa). The Indian species, Aquila hastata is no longer consider to be a subspecies but a full species on it’s own, the Indian Spotted Eagle.

Because of this, Europe has a great responsibility protecting the species. And Romania has more breeding pairs than most countries and plays an important role in the future of the species.

In this new interview, Daróczi J. Szilárd and Zeitz Róbert talk about the current situation of the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Romania, threats, necessary conservation measures and a LIFE projects they are working on.

You an also learn about what food the eagles eat or what is known about the movement of the birds.

See the interview here:
New Interview with Daróczi J. Szilárd and Zeitz Róbert about the Lesser Spotted Eagle in Romania

Lesser Spotted Eagle from Poland testing GPS logger

The Eagle Conservation Committee from Poland is testing a GPS logger device with data transmission through a GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) system. They are tracking an adult male Lesser Spotted Eagle from Biebrza Valley.

The migration route of the eagle can be found here:
http://maps.google.pl/maps/ms?vpsrc=1&ctz=-60&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=212295177782475204956.0004afdf3ff1fd974f5f1&t=h&ll=41.614408,29.517074&spn=24.05245,13.908149&source=embed

More information (in Polish, Google Translate works very well) can be found here:
www.koo.org.pl

The White-tailed Eagle as a flagship species for conservation along the Danube river

The White-tailed Eagle is the largest eagle in Europe, females can reach a wingspan of a little over 250cm. Over the last decades the population has increased in most countries where the species occurs.

A major backbone for the species in Europe is the Danube river. It breeds in all countries along the Danube except Germany (it breeds in Germany but not yet at the Danube).

About 2 weeks ago, a conference was held close to the Duna-Dráva National Park (Hungary) about the conservation of this magnificent eagle.

Many experts got together and we learned a lot about recent population trends, projects and threats affecting the White-tailed Eagle. Here are some summaries from the talks:

  • Germany now has 700(!) pairs but not yet one at the Danube. This is for 2011. They are already regular winter visitors and several pairs in Bavaria are already quite close to the Danube so this is only a matter of time until Germany will also have White-tailed Eagles breeding along he Danube.
  • Lead poisoning is still a serious threat for White-tailed Eagles and other raptors.
  • A management plan has been written and was presented by Remo Probst (also see this interivew with Remo). The management plan will soon be published (I will announce it here once it is available)
  • In Romania there are still gaps in our knowledge about the species, particularly outside the Danube delta.
  • The White-tailed Eagle online database was announced. See here: White-taild Eagle online database .
  • The Austrian population has reached 14 pairs and 15 young fledged (the species was extinct in Austria and the first recolonising pair was observed in 1999).
  • The Hungarian population grew from about 20-30 pairs in the late 1980s to over 230 pairs in 2011.

The Danube Parks project has chosen the White-tailed Eagle as a flagship species for conservation along the Danube river and is working on projects to improve the conditions for the eagles and other species like the Danube sturgeons. This is a great network of protected areas and dedicated conservationists who have already achieved a lot and hopefully more projects will be realised in the coming years. The White-tailed Eagle is a great choice as a flagship species and from its protection many other species along the Danube river will benefit.

See the Danube Parks project website to learn more:
Danube Parks project

Irish Golden Eagle Project Summary 2001-2011

The Golden Eagle Trust has published a summary of the Golden Eagle reintroduction project in Ireland for 2001 to 2011.
It contains breeding numbers, youngs fledged, birds released and much more. Illegal persecution is covered and at the end a summary for other raptor species like the Red Kite and the White-tailed Eagle is included.

Go here to read the full report:
Irish Golden Eagle Project Summary 2001-2011

Рroceedings on the 6th International Conference for Conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle available for download

The proceedings on the 6th International Conference for Conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle are available for download:

Рroceedings on the 6th International Conference for Conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle.

For the download to work you have to register. It might happen that you will see a Bulgarian website when you click “Download the publication”. Just click on the English icon in the top right corner and the website will change back to English.

This is a must read for anyone interested in the Eastern Imperial Eagle. I don’t know of any publication with more up to date details on the species.

Also see this interview:
Interview with Dimitar Demerdjiev about the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria

Juvenile Eastern Imperial Eagle shot in Austria

The population of the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Austria and neighbouring countries is still small and every bird that dies because of humans is one too many.

Although the breeding success in 2011 was the highest in Austria since the species came back as a breeding species (10 pairs, 7 successful, 14 young fledged), one of the juveniles has already been shot – and this was only detected because the bird hat a transmitter which was attached to the young eagle by Birdlife Austria as part of their conservation program of the Eastern Imperial Eagle.

This is very sad and a shame that something like this still happens in 2011. And it is not the first case of an illegally shot eagle. Since 2007 at least 4 White-tailed Eagles have been shot. And more eagles (both species) have been poisoned during the last years. And of course not all illegally killed birds are found.

More information (in German ) can be found here:

http://www.birdlife.at/coro-skat/presse/junger-kaiseradler-abgeschossen.html

New important publication about lead poisoning and raptors

Lead poisoning is a serious threat to many raptors like the White-tailed Eagle, Golden Eagle, Bearded Vulture or Steller’s Sea Eagle.
A new important German publication (with English summaries for every article) about this issue with a focus on the White-tailed Eagle is now available from the Leibniz-Institut für Zoo- und Wildtierforschung in Berlin where Sea Eagle expert Oliver Krone and his team have been doing research on lead poisoning for many years.
The new book (more than 120 pages) was published after a conference on the topic in 2009 and has many papers about the feeding ecology, population dynamics and lead poisoning of the White-tailed Eagle and other species like the Bearded Vulture or the impressive Steller’s Sea Eagle.

This is a must read for anyone who is interested in lead poisoning and raptors.

More information about the book and important facts about White-tailed Eagles and lead poisoning is available here:

seeadlerforschung.de.

The table of contents of the new book is here (PDF):
http://seeadlerforschung.de/downloads/Inhaltsverzeichnis_II.pdf

A detailed and very good review in German of this publication written bei Dieter Haas can be found in this PDF:

BuchrezensionBlei.pdf

New interview with Vitaly Vetrov about the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Ukraine

Another interview about the Eastern Imperial Eagle in available:

Interview with Vitaly Vetrov about the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Ukraine

In this interview Vitaly Vetrov talks about the current situation, population development, threats and future of the Eastern Imperial Eagle in the Ukraine and also gives a short overview about the status of the Steppe Eagle.

The interview is also available in Russian.

New interview with Dimitar Demerdjiev about the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria

 

Eastern Imperial Eagle.
© Svetoslav Spasov

The Eastern Imperial Eagle is a globally threatened species with only a few hundred pairs breeding in Europe. A lot of conservation work is done for the species in countries like Hungary, Slovakia or Ukraine.
In Bulgaria the Bulgarian Society for the Potection of Birds (BSPB) and other organisations have been working for many years to protect the small Bulgarian population.

In a new interview, Dimitar Demerdjiev from the (BSPB) talks about biology and conservation of the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria. Dimitar explains the food and habitat requirements, threats like cultivation of habitat, wind farms, reduction of prey species, what the BSPS is doing and much more.

The interview can be found here:

Interview with Dimitar Demerdjiev about the Eastern Imperial Eagle in Bulgaria

Also make sure to visit the following website of the BSPB about Eastern Imperial Eagles and Saker Falcons in Bulgaria:
Conservation of Imperial Eagle and Saker Faclon in Bulgaria

Information about how to support the BSPB can be found on their website (their is an icon for an English version of the website in the top right corner).
http://bspb.org/index.php

More interviews about the Eastern Imperial eagle can be found on the species account on europeanraptors.org (scroll down a bit):
Eastern Imperial Eagle species account