American Eagle Foundation announces international eagle grants

23. July 2018

The American Eagle Foundation is proud to announce that starting July1, 2018, we will be accepting proposals for our first ever, International Eagle Grants. The American Eagle
Foundation’s International Eagle Grants program will be targeted at funding research and conservation for eagle species in developing, underserved areas. The grants will help to promote research and conservation focused on eagles, and award decisions will be made based on a combination of quality of the proposal and the proposed project, the conservation status of the species, the urgency of the need for the project, and the qualifications of the applicants. Up to $10,000 in grants will be available with grant requests of $500 to $5,000 considered.

The AEF International Eagle Grants Program will be discharged in a manner similar to our Bald Eagle Grants program. For more information on this program, see our website at
https://www.eagles.org/what-we-do/conserve-protect/bald-eagle-grants/ . To date, the American Eagle Foundation has awarded over $600,000 in grants to help to further our understanding and conservation of the Bald Eagle. Grants were first awarded in 2012, with about $100,000 awarded yearly (no awards were granted for 2013).

The American Eagle Foundation uses a Bald Eagle Grant Advisory Team to numerically rank all grant applications. This team consists of some of the Nation's outstanding eagle experts and will be the same team used to rank proposals for the AEF International Eagle Grants Program.

The American Eagle Foundation is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization whose mission is to protect and preserve the United States’ living symbol of freedom, the Bald Eagle, and other birds of prey. The American Eagle Foundation is celebrating its 32nd year of carrying out its mission through Preservation, Repopulation, Education, and Rehabilitation. It is headquartered in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains at Dollywood Family Theme Park in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee.

The American Eagle Foundation International Eagle Program will accept applications July 1 – September 1, 2018 for grants, beginning the next calendar year. Names of successful applicants and their projects will be shared at the Raptor Research Foundation Annual Conference for 2018, to be held in Skukuza, South Africa.

If you are interested in applying for an AEF International Eagle Grant, contact grant coordinator Jody Millar ateaglegrants@gmail.com to access required forms.

New book about the raptors of Italy

21. February 2018

 

A new book, written in Italian, has recently been published about the raptors of Italy.

It is called Rapaci d’Italia and is written by Federico Cauli e Fulvio Genero.

It covers all raptor species of Italiy, their biology and status.

More information in Italian can be found here on the publishers website:

Rapaci d’Italia

The contact information (email) for ordering the book can be found here: Contatti

Make sure to also read an interview I published a few years ago with Fulivo Genero, one of the authors.

Interview with Fulvio Genero about vultures in Italy

 

Owl are coming to europeanraptors.org

22. November 2015

Although not closely related from an evolutionary point of view, owls are often ecologically similar to raptors. And some owls strongly interact with diurnal raptors via competition or even predation. For example, the Eurasian Eagle Owl can be a powerful predator of most European raptors species and also other owls.

For this reason, and because owls a very interesting birds, I’ve added species accounts for the owls. Currently they are empty but content is coming soon. Make sure to come back regularly.

I’ll first start working on the Eurasian Eagle Owl and Ural Owl.

3 new Spanish books about raptors and owls in Europe

15. November 2015

Transparente-para-web

Three new books (written in Spanish) are currently being written with the first volume already available. The 1st book covers the European eagles, the 2nd book the remainig raptors and the 3rd book is about the European owls.

The first volume is called “Aves de Presa – Las Águilas de España y Europa” and covers the european eagles.

The book are a mix of great pictures and interesting text. I will publish a short review once I have a copy in my hands.

Aves de Presa – Las Águilas de España y Europa

New book: The Life of Buzzards by Dr. Peter Dare

14. February 2015

Whittles Publishing has announced the publication (March 2015) of a new book by Dr. Peter Dare called “The Life of Buzzards”.

The book covers the Common Buzzard. It is great to see that finally a new book about the biology of this fascinating raptor is now being published.

According to the website the book covers:

  • The fascinating lives of Buzzards are revealed from extensive studies over many years
  • A long overdue update of the natural history and ecology of the Common Buzzard
  • Provides detailed accounts of their breeding cycle from courtship until fledging of broods
  • Guidance provided on Buzzard breeding studies including interpretation of aerial behaviour

More information about the book on the publishers website:

The Life of Buzzards.

The publisher will send me a copy of the book (many thanks to Whittles Publishing!). A review of the book will follow once I’ve read it.

Buzzards_cover

New Spanish raptor book: Viaje a las rapaces

17. April 2014

Recently, Tundra Ediciones published a new beautiful raptor book called “Viaja a las rapaces” (Journey to the raptors).
It is completely in Spanish. It is not a scientific work but still very interesting. It aims to “bring the emotions of watching raptors in the wild” to the reader.
Erything is beautifully illustrated with wonderful drawings.

The book is written and illustrated by Juan Varela and Víctor J. Hernández.

More information about the book can be found here:

Viaje a las rapaces

Upcoming Neotropical raptor to tour in Belize in August 2014

4. March 2014

Belize, a small country south of Mexico is a fantastic place for watching neotropical raptors and other birds and animals like the Morelet’s crocodile.
It is a great place to see raptors like the Ornate Hawk-Eagle, Black Hawk-Eagle, Black-and-white Hawk Eagle, King Vulture, White Hawk, Aplomado Falcon, Orange-breasted Falcon and many more.
With some (or maybe a lot of) luck even Jaguar sightings might be possible.

A wonderful way to travel to Belize is with the great guys from the Belize Raptor Research Institute. They know the place like no other, have an in-depth knowlegde of the indentification and ecology of the local raptors and wildlife and actively do conservation work in Belize for raptors like the Solitary Eagle.
I was on a trip with them myself in December 2012 and it was spectacular with many raptors and other amazing sightings, great food, wonderful people and many fantastic experiences.

Their next trip is in August 2014. If you want to do Neotropical birding or raptor watching, this will be a fantastic trip.

More information:
Event: 2014 Belize Raptor Tour: An Experience of a Lifetime!

5th Carinthian Raptor Migration Camp in Austria – starting August, 19th

25. July 2011

The 5th Carinthian Raptor Migration Camp 2012 in Austria (near the Italian and Slovenian border) starts on August, 19th and ends on August 28th. In it’s fourth year, this successful raptor camp is a fantastic opportunity to experience raptor migration, meat other raptor enthusiasts and experts and learn more about those amazing birds.
I was there last year and we had great fun and saw many raptors incl. Common Buzzards, Hobbies and many Honey Buzzards. A few observers also saw a Griffon Vulture.
I will be there again this year giving a talk about raptor conservation in Europe (on August 27th).

More information (in German) can be found in this document:
5th_Carinthian_Raptor_Migration_Camp_Aussendung.doc

If you can’t read the German just open the document and at the end you will find the email address of Remo Probst, the guy who is organising the camp. You can ask him further questions.

Eastern Imperial Eagle poisoned in Bulgaria

20. June 2011

A globally threatened Eastern Imperial Eagle was poisoned in Bulgaria. The bird was killed by eating a poisonous pigeon-trap. This is very sad. For such a rare species, every lost bird is one too much.

More information:
New crime against endangered Imperial Eagle

And a second poisoned bait has also been found:
http://saveraptors.org/en/news.php?id=172

New book: Kestrels for Company by Gordon Riddle:

18. February 2011
Kestrels for Company - by Gorden Riddle

The new Kestrels book by Gordon Riddle

In the last post I announced a new book about Hen Harriers published by Whittles Publishing. The same publisher has also recently announced another raptor book about the Common Kestrel. It will be published in April 2011 and is written by Gordon Riddle who has observed the Common Kestrel for almost 40 years in Britain.

Below is the information from the press release of the publisher:

An appealing book that rightfully raises the profile of the kestrel. It provides an extensive picture of this delightful falcon, including its lifestyle and the factors that affect its breeding success and survival. This is based upon almost 40 years monitoring of the kestrel in south-west Scotland and further afield by the author and colleagues, giving a flavour of the integrated approach to monitoring and conservation.
As well as the wealth of factual data, there are entertaining anecdotes and stories both from the author’s experiences and from the wider media coverage of this raptor over the years. The reader is taken to exotic locations such as the Seychelles, Mauritius and the Cape Verde Islands to see the endemic island kestrels which have always held a great fascination for the author.
Latest figures show an alarming decline of 36% in the kestrel population in the UK, with even more dramatic falls such as 64% in Scotland. The fieldwork techniques which play such an important role are detailed in a composite breeding season. The kestrel is not portrayed in isolation and the bird’s current circumstance is tied into the bigger picture of raptor conservation and the struggle against sustained persecution.
The author reflects upon the political, economic and conservation issues that have dominated this field in the past few decades and through this personal and well-informed account the reader gains access to the world of the kestrel.

More information:
Publishers Press Release (PDF)

Publishers website for the book