Lesser Spotted Eagle from Poland testing GPS logger

13. November 2011

The Eagle Conservation Committee from Poland is testing a GPS logger device with data transmission through a GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) system. They are tracking an adult male Lesser Spotted Eagle from Biebrza Valley.

The migration route of the eagle can be found here:
http://maps.google.pl/maps/ms?vpsrc=1&ctz=-60&ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=212295177782475204956.0004afdf3ff1fd974f5f1&t=h&ll=41.614408,29.517074&spn=24.05245,13.908149&source=embed

More information (in Polish, Google Translate works very well) can be found here:
www.koo.org.pl

New poster available: On the biology of the Honey Buzzard (Pernis apivorus) – Results of Satellite Tracking

26. December 2010

Bernd-Ulrich Meyburg and colleagues have made available a new poster presentation about the results of tracking Honey Buzzards with a satellite transmitter:

Meyburg, B.-U., F. Ziesemer, H. D. Martens & C. Meyburg 2010. On the biology of the Honey Buzzard (Pernis apivorus) – Results of Satellite Tracking. 7th International Symposium “Population Ecology of Raptors and Owls”, Halberstadt, Germany, 21.-24.10.2010: Poster.

The poster can be downloaded here:
http://www.raptor-research.de/pdfs/a_sp100p/a_sp148_Meyburg_2010_Honey_Buzzard.pdf

Very interesting information for everyone interested in the biology and migration of Honey Buzzards.

New posters about Eastern Imperial Eagles and Steppe Eagles by Bernd Meyburg

4. November 2010

Bernd Meyburg is one of the leading experts on satellite tracking of raptors. His studies have revealed many important details in the life of raptors like Amur Falcons, Lesser and Greater Spotted Eagles and many others.

On his website he makes many publications available online.

Now two new publications are available (as poster presentations):

Meyburg, B.-U. & C. Meyburg 2010. Satellite tracking of Imperial Eagles Aquila heliaca. 6th International Conference on Asian Raptors. Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, 23-27 June 2010: Poster
http://www.raptor-research.de/pdfs/a_sp100p/a_sp146_Poster_Imp_Eagle.pdf

Meyburg, B.-U. & C. Meyburg 2010. Migration strategies of 16 Steppe Eagles Aquila nipalensis tracked by satellite. 6th International Conference on Asian Raptors. Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, 23-27 June 2010: Poster
http://www.raptor-research.de/pdfs/a_sp100p/a_sp147_poster_Steppe_Eagle.pdf

Make sure to also have a look at all the other publications on Bernd Meyburgs website.

New study about genetic diversity of the Polish population of the Montagu’s Harrier

27. October 2010

In Poland a new study has been started about the genetic diversity of the Polish population of the Montagu’s Harrier. For this feathers will be collected, not only in Poland but in many countries incl. Spain, France, Germany or Russia.

If you want to contribute to protecting the harrier, help in collecting feathers for genetic research! For more information, have a look here:

Genetic diversity of the Polish population harrier Circus pygargus in the context of its protection

There you can find a description on how to help and how to collect and store feathers and where to send them.

At the bottom of the page is a PDF about the project in Polish, English and German.

For more information, ask Dominik Krupinski. His email address can be found at the bottom of the above mentioned website.

Satellite tracking of juvenile Short-toed Eagles in Italy

29. September 2010

Satellite tracking is an important tool to learn more about the movements and threats of raptors. A new project follows the movements and migration of juvenile Short-toed Eagles in Italy. Two eagles were fitted with satellite transmitters in the Regional Park Gallipoli Cognato. The project is done by Ugo Mellone (who already did a great interview for europeanraptors.org about the Mediterranean Raptor Migration Network ).

To follow the movements of those two young eagles, click here:
http://www.parcogallipolicognato.it/ita/web/nav.asp?nav=130

New publication: Widespread hybridization between the Greater Spotted Eagle Aquila clanga and the Lesser Spotted Eagle Aquila pomarina (Aves: Accipitriformes) in Europe

24. August 2010

A new and very interesting paper about the hybridization between the Greater Spotted Eagle Aquila clanga and the Lesser Spotted Eagle Aquila pomarina in Europe has recently been published and made available for download on the website by Bernd Ulrich Meyburg:


Väli, Ü., V. Dombrovski, R. Treinys, U. Bergmanis, S. J. Daróczi, M. Dravecky, V. Ivanovski, J. Lontkowski, G. Maciorowski, B.-U. Meyburg, T. Mizera, R. Zeitz & H. Ellegren 2010: Widespread hybridization between the Greater Spotted Eagle Aquila clanga and the Lesser Spotted Eagle Aquila pomarina (Aves: Accipitriformes) in Europe. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 100: 725-736.

Download:
http://www.raptor-research.de/pdfs/a_rp800p/a_rp803_Widespread_hybridization.pdf

Also have a look at the many other interesting publications available on this website:
http://raptor-research.de

Satellite telemetry of Eleonora’s Falcon migration from Greece

9. November 2009

The exact migration route of the Eleonora’s Falcon has long been a mystery.
Satellite telemetry has helped in recent years to find out more about the migration of this elegant raptor. This year, for the first time in Greece, 2 adult and 2 juvenile falcons were equipped with satellite transmitters in their breeding colony on the island of Andros.
The movement of those 4 birds can be followed via the project’s website:

Satellite telemetry of Eleonora’s Falcon migration

The migratory journey of Eleonora’s Falcons – with Maps

Movements of Red-footed Falcons on the Internet

20. September 2009

This year, 8 Red-footed Falcons from Hungary are tracked via Satellite. Two have already left Hungary and are located north of the Black Sea coast.
The birds and their movements can also be followed on the web.
This is part of a LIFE project for the conservation of the Red-footed Falcon in the Pannonian Region.

More information:
Conservation of the Red-footed Falcon in the Pannonian Region
Overview of tagged birds.
Map with the location of the birds

Toxicological sampling and ringing of all juvenile Egyptian Vultures in Bulgaria

17. September 2009

The Egyptian Vulture is one of the most endangered raptors in Europe. Illegal poisoning and habitat loss are a constant threat in many areas.

Another threat are high levels of toxic substances in the birds, like pathogens of poultry and pigeons, antibiotics and non-steroidal antiinflamatory drugs. Those substances have been found in Egyptian Vultures in Bulgaria. (see here for details).

In order to find out more about that problem, this year, BSPB (Birdlife Bulgaria) did a made toxicology sampling of all 25 unfledged juvenile vultures this year. Also, all birds were ringed.

The toxicological samples will be analysed in Madrid, Spain. The final results of this study will be published in 2010.

The Egyptian Vulture has declined dramatically in Bulgaria. From 2003 to 2008, the species declined from 57 to 35 pairs. The high levels of toxins probably play an important role in the species’ decline.

More information:
Alarming results from toxicology study on the Egyptian vulture in Bulgaria
BSPB made toxicology sampling and ringed all juvenile Egyptian Vultures in Bulgaria

Hungarian Saker Falcon in Spain

30. August 2009

The Saker Falcon Falco Cherrug is a globally endangered raptor species. In Europe, there are only about 450 breeding pairs. During the last years, the populations in Hungary, Austria and Slovakia have increased.
In order to learn more about the endangered falcons and the biology, some birds in Hungary have been fitted with a satellite transmitter. This allows to gain exact knowledge about the movements of the birds. If a bird dies, the cause of death can often be found out. This provides crucial information for conservation projects.

Detailed information about the work can be found on the project’s website.

A very interesting dispersal route was taken by one female Saker Falcon who moved to Spain and has already spend some time there (the bird appeared there in early August).

This shows that a Saker Falcon who is seen far away from it’s breeding area in eastern Europe is not always an escaped falconry bird.

More information:

Conservation of Saker (Falco cherrug) in the Carpathian Basin

Satellite-tracked Hungarian Saker (Falco cherrug) in N Spain