Category Archives: Vultures

New newsletter about migratory birds from Euronatur available

Euronatur has published the latest edition of their newsletter about migratory birds. The newsletter also covers species that are not migratory.
This new edition is currently only available in German. It covers many raptor species including Bearded Vulture, Cinereous Vulture, Greater Spotted Eagle, Eastern Imperial Eagle, White-tailed Eagle and Saker Falcon.

Click here to go to the latest edition of this newsletter:
http://www.euronatur.org/Ausgabe-16-April-2010.1007.0.html

New Interview with Simeon Marin from Green Balkans about the conservation of Eastern Imperial Eagles, Lesser Kestrels and Cinereous Vultures in Bulgaria.

Eastern Imperial Eagle family breakfast

Eastern Imperial Eagle family breakfast.
© Picture: Dobromir Dobrinov/Green Balkans

A new interview is available:

Interview with Simeon Marin from Green Balkans about the conservation of Eastern Imperial Eagles, Lesser Kestrels and Cinereous Vultures in Bulgaria.

The interview covers the work of Green Balkans for a project called “Conservation measures for target species of the EU Birds Directive – Lesser Kestrel, Black Vulture, and Imperial Eagle in their main habitats in Bulgaria”

All three species are threatened across Europe and in Bulgaria, currently only the Eastern Imperial Eagle is a regular, but rare, breeding species.
Green Balkans works to increase the number of the Eastern Imperial Eagle and hopes that both the Lesser Kestrel and the Cinereous Vulture will come back as a regular breeding species to Bulgaria.

Reed the interview to learn more about this important project and what Green Balkans is doing to protect those three amazing raptor species.

Griffon Vultures are breeding in Kresna Gorge in Bulgaria again after 60 years

Eurasian Griffon Vulture

Eurasian Griffon Vulture, Spain, December 2007, © Markus Jais

After a few Griffon Vultures escaped before the planned date for a reintroduction in Bulgaria, the birds already started the first breeding attempts in the Kresna Gorge in Bulgaria – after an absense of 60 years.

Emilian Stoynov from the Fund for Wild Flora and Fauna wrote on the Balkan Vultures mailing list.

One pair is actively bringing sticks and is building nest and copulation was several times observed. It seems they will soon lay an egg. The nest is easily visible from the road in the gorge.

There is also second pair showing breeding behavior and it seems it is already incubating. But the breeding of this second pair is only indirectly documented, based on the presence of different birds at the feeding site and obvious changes of incubating partners.

There is also evidence for even third breeding pair. However this needs further confirmation.

The reintroduction project for the Griffon Vulture is a important step towards securing the future of this amazing species in Europe.

For more information, please visit the website of the Fund for Wild Flora and Fauna:
http://fwff.org

Cinereous Vulture is Bird of the Year 2010 in Spain

SEO/Birdlife Spain has declared the “Buitre Negro” (Black Vulture) as the “Ave del Año 2010” (Bird of the Year 2010).
The Cinereous Vulture is the largest raptor in Europe and most European pairs breed in Spain. There, according to SEO, the population has increased from less than 200 pairs to more than 2,000 pairs today.
But there are still threats to the species like poisoning or lack of food.

To find out more about the conservation program for the Cinerous Vulture, visit the website for the Bird of the Year 2010 in Spain:

http://www.seo.org/programa_intro.cfm?idPrograma=88

There is a video and lot’s of information (in Spanish).

New interview with Stavros Xirouchakis about Vultures on Crete

Stavros Xirouchakis at feeding station

Stavros Xirouchakis at feeding station

I am happy to announce another interview, this time with Stavros Xirouchakis about the current situation of the Vultures on Crete:
Interview with Stavros Xirouchakis about Vultures on Crete

Of the four European vulture species, the Bearded and the Griffon Vulture breed on Crete. The Cinereous vulture is a rare winter visitor and the Egyptian vulture is an autumn migrant.

In the interview, Stavros explains the threats to vultures on Crete (like poison and wind farms) and what needs to be done to secure a future for those magnificent raptors on Crete.

Stavros also wrote an article about vulture conservation in Greece in the upcoming book:
Buitres, muladares y legislación sanitaria: perspectivas de un conflicto y sus consecuencias desde la Biología de la Conservación.
Vultures, feeding stations and sanitary legislation: a conflict and its consequences from the perspective of conservation biology.

See here for more information about the book:
New vulture book: Vultures, feeding stations and sanitary legislation: a conflict and its consequences from the perspective of conservation biology

New interview with Richard Zink about the Bearded Vulture in the Alps

Bearded Vulture

Bearded Vulture, Italy,
© Henning Werth

A new interview is available on europeanraptors.org, this time about the Bearded Vulture, one of the most spectacular raptors in Europe:

Interview with Richard Zink about the Bearded Vulture in the Alps

The Bearded Vulture is one of the most interesting raptors in the world. Unfortunately, in Europe it is also one of the most endangered ones. It was completely wiped out in the Alps but thanks to a huge reintroduction program, the species is back and breeding successfully in the wild.
In this new interview, Richard Zink explains the current situation of the Bearded Vulture in the Alps, the work of the International Bearded Vulture Monitoring and the future of the species.
Richard also explains at what to look for when you see a Bearded Vulture in the Alps and where to send the data of your sightings. Every observation can yield new information.

Make sure to also visit the website of the International Bearded Vulture Monitoring:
www.gyp-monitoring.com

BSPB makes Egyptian Vulture research expedition to East Africa

The Bulgarian Society for the protection of birds has a conservation programm for the Egyptian Vulture.

As part of the project, members of the BSPB made a trip to Ethiopia to learn more about wintering Egyptian vultures there. They counted 1424 Egyptian Vultures. None of them had rings used to mark 52 juveniles during 2008 and 2009 in Bulgaria, indicating that most Egyptian Vultures from Bulgaria probably spend the winter somewhere else.

As in many areas around the world, the Egyptian Vulture shows a decline in the Afar region. The BSPB suspects the following causes leading to a decline:

  • Increased adult mortality due to poisoning in the wintering grounds in South Ethiopia and North Kenya;
  • Increased mortality as a result of illegal poaching along the migration route in The Near and Middle East;
  • Increased mortality in the breeding grounds;

The Egyptian vulture is one of the most endangered raptors in Bulgaria (and in Europe). In Bulgaria the population declined from 57 pairs in 2003 to only 31 in 2009. If the trend continues, BSPB fears that the species may be extinct in Bulgaria in 20-25 years.

For a more detailed report and for information about the BSPB Egyptiann Vulture conservation work, see here:
The Egyptian Vulture – What’s going on in Afrika?
(Click on the English icon on the top right corner if you only see the Bulgarian Version)

New vulture book: Vultures, feeding stations and sanitary legislation: a conflict and its consequences from the perspective of conservation biology

A new book about the European vultures is forthcoming (available soon). It is bilingual with texts in Spanish and English.

Written by many of the leading vulture experts in Europe, it is the most detailed and up to date publication about European vultures I know of.

Book details:

Buitres, muladares y legislación sanitaria: perspectivas de un conflicto y sus consecuencias desde la Biología de la Conservación.
Vultures, feeding stations and sanitary legislation: a conflict and its consequences from the perspective of conservation biology.

Tamaño / Size: 21 x 29,7 cm (A4)
Numero de páginas / Pages: 552
Textos / Texts: Inglés – castellano / English and Spanish
Libro con numerosas fotografías, tablas y gráficos / Book with of dozens of mapes, tables, figures and pho

Publisher: Sociedad de Ciencias Aranzadi

The prize of the book is 30 Euros.

More details incl. full table of contents and a bilingual order form can be found in this PDF:

hojapedido.pdf

You can also the book here:
www.weboryx.com

This new book will be a must have for everyone interested in European vultures. And a lot of the information will also be useful for vultures outside of Europe.

New interview with Rubén Moreno-Opo about the Cinereous Vulture in Spain

 

Cinereous Vulture

Cinereous Vulture, Monfragüe Nationalpark, Extremadura.
© Markus Jais

The Cinereous Vulture is the largest raptor in Europe and a spectacular sight. I am very happy to announce another interview on euroeapraptors.org, this time with Cinereous Vulture expert Rubén Moreno-Opo about the Cinereous Vulture in Spain, where most of the European pairs breed.

Here is the interview:
Interview with Rubén Moreno-Opo about the Cinereous Vulture in Spain

Rubén talks about the current population trend, the threats and conservation measures, the relationship with traditional livestock farming, hunting activities and much more.
If you want to learn more about this spectacular bird, be sure to read the interview.